Data Factory – Executing an Azure Machine Learning Web Service

Datetime:2016-08-23 01:32:24          Topic: Web Service  Windows Azure  Data Mining           Share

My last blog post showed how to copy data to a blob storage account, which I needed to do to be able to call an Azure Machine Learning [ML] Web Service. When calling a ML Web Service, the data must be in an Azure Blob Storage account. Once a ML model has been trained, and a web services has been created, it’s ready for production. Calling the experiment in Data Factory allows the ML to be run with tens of thousands of rows as part of a scheduled process. Prior to inserting the ML web service in Data Factory, make sure that you test it to ensure there are no errors with the web service, as Data Factory does not expose all of the ML errors which may be encountered by the web service.

Creating Azure Machine Learning Data Factory Pipelines

Two new steps need to be added to the existing Data Factory Pipeline, one to call the ML Web Service and one for the output. The ML pipeline requires two pieces of JSON code, a linked service to make the connection to the web service and a pipeline to invoke the job and specify the inputs and the Outputs. For the Output, the first step requires no JSON as first a blob storage container in Azure needs to be created to store it. The next steps involve writing JSON to create a linked service to connect to it and lastly an Output dataset needs to be defined.

Calling Machine Learning Service

The Linked Service for ML is going to need some information from the Web Service, the URL and the API key. Chances are neither of these have been committed to memory, instead open up Azure ML, go to Web Service and copy them. For the URL, look under the API Help Page grid, there are two options, Request/Response and Batch Execution . Clicking on Batch Execution loads a new page Batch Execution API Document . The URL can be found under Request URI . When copying the URL, you do not need to include any text after the word “jobs”. The rest of the URL, “?api-version=2.0”. Copying the entire URL will cause an error. Going back to the web Services page, The API Key appears on the dashboard section of Azure ML and there is a convenient button for copying it. Using these two pieces of information, it is now possible to create the Data Factory Linked Service to make the connection to the web service, which here I called AzureMLLinkedService


{

"name": "AzureMLLinkedService",

"properties": {

"description": "Connecting ML Experiment”

"hubName": " GingerDataFactoryTest_hub",

"type": "AzureML",

"typeProperties": {

"mlEndpoint": "https://ussouthcentral.services.azureml.net/workspaces/fbe056b6d4c74d7f9d1954367dc3fa61/services/xxa56efd75b745e28cd0512822d17eae/jobs",

"apiKey": "**********"

}

}

}

We will need another linked service for the Output, which takes the data from the experiment and writes it to a blob. The field names in the experiment are listed.


{

"name": "OutputML",

"properties": {

"structure": [

{"name": "Age", "type": "Int32" }

,

{ "name": "workclass", "type": "string" }

,

{ "name": "education-num", "type": "Int32" }

,

{ "name": "marital-status", "type": "String" }

,

{ "name": "occupation", "type": "String" }

,

{ "name": "relationship", "type": "String" }

,

{ "name": "race", "type": "String" }

,

{ "name": "sex", "type": "String" }

,

{ "name": "hours-per-week", "type": "Int32" }

,

{ "name": "native-country", "type": "String" }

,

{"name": "Scored Labels","type": "Int32"}

,

{"name": "Scored Probabilities","type": "Decimal"}

],

"published": false,

"type": "AzureSqlTable",

"linkedServiceName": "LinkedServiceOutput",

"typeProperties": {

"tableName": "ExperimentMLOutput"

},

"availability": {

"frequency": "Hour",

"interval": 1

},

"external": false,

"policy": {}

}

}

The API key will show the actual value until you save it, at which point it will change to the stars you see here. This Linked Service will be referenced in the next bit of JSON for the pipeline


"name": "PipelineML",

"properties": {

"description": "Use Azure ML Model",

"activities": [

{

"type": "AzureMLBatchExecution",

"typeProperties": {

"webServiceInput": "InputDataSetBlob",

"webServiceOutputs": {

"output1": "OutputDataSetBlob"

},

"globalParameters": {}

},

"inputs": [

{

"name": "InputDataSetBlob"

}

],

"outputs": [

{

"name": "OutputDataSetBlob"

}

],

"policy": {

"timeout": "02:00:00",

"concurrency": 3,

"executionPriorityOrder": "NewestFirst",

"retry": 1

},

"scheduler": {

"frequency": "Hour",

"interval": 1

},

"name": "MLActivity",

"description": "Execute Experiment",

"linkedServiceName": "AzureMLLinkedService"

}

],

"start": "2016-08-19T10:30:00Z",

"end": "2016-08-20T23:30:00Z",

"isPaused": true,

"hubName": " GingerDataFactoryTest_hub ",

"pipelineMode": "Scheduled"

}

}

Lastly another Dataset needs to be created to process the output. The data will be written to a file called Output.csv, which is in a folder called mloutput01/ which is located in the Blob storage container, which is the same one I used previously for the input folder used earlier.   This file will be overwritten every single time this is run.


{

"name": "OutputDataSetBlob",

"properties": {

"published": false,

"type": "AzureBlob",

"linkedServiceName": "AzureBlobStorageLinkedService",

"typeProperties": {

"fileName": "output.csv",

"folderPath": "mloutput01/",

"format": {

"type": "TextFormat",

"columnDelimiter": ","

}

},

"availability": {

"frequency": "Hour",

"interval": 1

},

"external": false,

"policy": {}

}

}

If you add this code onto the previous Data Factory code, you can take data from the database and use it to run a Azure ML experiment and run as much data as you want through the experiment.

Yours Always

Ginger Grant

Data aficionado et SQL Raconteur





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