Building your first Atom plugin

Datetime:2016-08-23 03:00:53          Topic: HTML           Share

Authored byGitHub Campus Expert @NickTikhonov .

This tutorial will teach you how to write your first package for the Atom text editor. We'll be building a clone ofSourcerer, a plugin for finding and using code snippets from StackOverflow. By the end of this tutorial you will have written a plugin that converts programming problems written in English into code snippets pulled from StackOverflow:

What you need to know

Atom is written using web technologies. Our package will be built entirely using the EcmaScript 6 standard for JavaScript. You will need to be familiar with:

  • Using the command line
  • JavaScript programming
  • Promises
  • HTTP

Tutorial repository

You can follow this tutorial step-by-step or check out the supplementary repository on GitHub , which contains the plugin source code. The repository history contains one commit for each step outlined here.

Getting Started

Installing Atom

Download Atom by following the instructions on the Atom website . We will also need to install apm , the Atom Package Manager command line tool. You can do this by opening Atom and navigating to Atom > Install Shell Commands in the application menu. Check that apm was installed correctly by opening your command line terminal and running apm -v , which should print the version of the tool and related environments:

apm -v
> apm  1.9.2
> npm  2.13.3
> node 0.10.40
> python 2.7.10
> git 2.7.4

Generating starter code

Let's begin by creating a new package using a utility provided by Atom.

  • Launch the editor and press Cmd+Shift+P (on MacOS) or Ctrl+Shift+P (on Windows/Linux) to open the Command Palette .

  • Search for "Package Generator: Generate Package" and click the corresponding item on the list. You will see a prompt where you can enter the name of the package - "sourcefetch" .

  • Press enter to generate the starter package, which should automatically be opened in Atom.

If you don't see package files appear in the sidebar, press Cmd+K Cmd+B (on MacOS) or Ctrl+K Ctrl+B (on Windows/Linux).

The Command Palette lets you find and run package commands using fuzzy search. This is a convenient way to run commands without navigating menus or remembering shortcuts. We will be using it throughout this tutorial.

Running the starter code

Let's try out the starter package before diving into the code itself. We will first need to reload Atom to make it aware of the new package that was added. Open the Command Palette again and run the "Window: Reload" command.

Reloading the current window ensures that Atom runs the latest version of our source code. We will be running this command every time we want to test the changes we make to our package.

Run the package toggle command by navigating to Packages > sourcefetch > Toggle using the editor menu, or run sourcefetch: Toggle using the Command Palette. You should see a black box appear at the top of the screen. Hide it by running the command again.

The "toggle" command

Let's open lib/sourcefetch.js , which contains the package logic and defines the toggle command.

toggle() {
 console.log('Sourcefetch was toggled!');
 return (
   this.modalPanel.isVisible() ?
   this.modalPanel.hide() :
   this.modalPanel.show()
 );
}

toggle is a function exported by the module. It uses a ternary operator to call show and hide on the modal panel based on its visibility. modalPanel is an instance of Panel , a UI element provided by the Atom API. We declare modalPanel inside export default , which lets us access it as an instance variable with this .

this.subscriptions.add(atom.commands.add('atom-workspace', {
  'sourcefetch:toggle': () => this.toggle()
}));

The above statement tells Atom to execute toggle every time the user runs sourcefetch:toggle . We subscribe an anonymous function , () => this.toggle() , to be called every time the command is run. This is an example of event-driven programming , a common paradigm in JavaScript.

Atom Commands

Commands are nothing more than string identifiers for events triggered by the user, defined within a package namespace. We've already used:

  • package-generator:generate-package
  • window:reload
  • sourcefetch:toggle

Packages subscribe to commands in order to execute code in response to these events.

Making your first code change

Let's make our first code change—we're going to change toggle to reverse text selected by the user.

Change "toggle"

  • Change the toggle function to match the snippet below.
toggle() {
  let editor
  if (editor = atom.workspace.getActiveTextEditor()) {
    let selection = editor.getSelectedText()
    let reversed = selection.split('').reverse().join('')
    editor.insertText(reversed)
  }
}

Test your changes

  • Reload Atom by running Window: Reload in the Command Palette

  • Navigate to File > New to create a new file, type anything you like and select it with the cursor.

  • Run the sourcefetch:toggle command using the Command Palette, Atom menu, or by right clicking and selecting "Toggle sourcefetch"

The updated command will toggle the order of the selected text:

See all code changes for this step in the sourcefetch tutorial repository .

The Atom Editor API

The code we added uses the TextEditor API to access and manipulate the text inside the editor. Let's take a closer look.

let editor
if (editor = atom.workspace.getActiveTextEditor()) { /* ... */ }

The first two lines obtain a reference to a TextEditor instance. The variable assignment and following code is wrapped in a conditional to handle the case where there is no text editor instance available, for example, if the command was run while the user was in the settings menu.

let selection = editor.getSelectedText()

Calling getSelectedText gives us access to text selected by the user. If no text is currently selected, the function returns an empty string.

let reversed = selection.split('').reverse().join('')
editor.insertText(reversed)

Our selected text is reversed using JavaScript String methods . Finally, we call insertText to replace the selected text with the reversed counterpart. You can learn more about the different TextEditor methods available by reading the Atom API documentation .

Exploring the starter package

Now that we've made our first code change, let's take a closer look at how an Atom package is organized by exploring the starter code.

The main file

The main file is the entry-point to an Atom package. Atom knows where to find the main file from an entry in package.json :

"main": "./lib/sourcefetch",

The file exports an object with lifecycle functions which Atom calls on certain events.

  • activateis called when the package is initially loaded by Atom. This function is used to initialize objects such as user interface elements needed by the package, and to subscribe handler functions to package commands.

  • deactivateis called when the package is deactivated, for example, when the editor is closed or refreshed by the user.

  • serializeis called by Atom to allow you to save the state of the package between uses. The returned value is passed as an argument to activate when the package is next loaded by Atom.

We are going to rename our package command to fetch , and remove user interface elements we won't be using. Update the file to match the version below:

'use babel';

import { CompositeDisposable } from 'atom'

export default {

  subscriptions: null,

  activate() {
    this.subscriptions = new CompositeDisposable()

    this.subscriptions.add(atom.commands.add('atom-workspace', {
      'sourcefetch:fetch': () => this.fetch()
    }))
  },

  deactivate() {
    this.subscriptions.dispose()
  },

  fetch() {
    let editor
    if (editor = atom.workspace.getActiveTextEditor()) {
      let selection = editor.getSelectedText()
      selection = selection.split('').reverse().join('')
      editor.insertText(selection)
    }
  }
};

Activation commands

To improve performance, Atom packages can be lazy loading . We can tell Atom to load our package only when certain commands are run by the user. These commands are called activation commands and are defined in package.json :

"activationCommands": {
  "atom-workspace": "sourcefetch:toggle"
},

Update this entry to make fetch an activation command.

"activationCommands": {
  "atom-workspace": "sourcefetch:fetch"
},

Some packages, such as those which modify Atom's appearance need to be loaded on startup. In those cases, activationCommands can be omitted entirely.

Triggering commands

Menu items

JSON files inside the menus folder specify which menu items are created for our package. Let's take a look at menus/sourcefetch.json :

"context-menu": {
  "atom-text-editor": [
    {
      "label": "Toggle sourcefetch",
      "command": "sourcefetch:toggle"
    }
  ]
},

The context-menu object lets us define new items in the right-click menu. Each item is defined by a label to be displayed in the menu and a command to run when the item is clicked.

"context-menu": {
  "atom-text-editor": [
    {
      "label": "Fetch code",
      "command": "sourcefetch:fetch"
    }
  ]
},

The menu object in the same file defines custom application menu items created for the package. We're going to rename this entry as well:

"menu": [
  {
    "label": "Packages",
    "submenu": [
      {
        "label": "sourcefetch",
        "submenu": [
          {
            "label": "Fetch code",
            "command": "sourcefetch:fetch"
          }
        ]
      }
    ]
  }
]

Keyboard shortcuts

Commands can also be triggered with keyboard shortcuts, defined with JSON files in the keymaps directory:

{
  "atom-workspace": {
    "ctrl-alt-o": "sourcefetch:toggle"
  }
}

The above lets package users call toggle with Ctrl+Alt+O on Windows/Linux or Cmd+Alt+O on MacOS.

Rename the referenced command to fetch :

"ctrl-alt-o": "sourcefetch:fetch"

Reload Atom by running the Window: Reload command. You should see that the application and right-click menus are updated, and the reverse functionality should work as before.

See all code changes for this step in the sourcefetch tutorial repository .

Using NodeJS modules

Now that we've made our first code change and learned about Atom package structure, let's introduce our first dependency—a module from Node Package Manager (npm) . We will use the request module to make HTTP requests and download the HTML of a website. This functionality will be needed later, to scrape StackOverflow pages.

Installing dependencies

Open your command line application, navigate to your package root directory and run:

npm install --save request@2.73.0
apm install

These commands add the request Node module to our dependencies list and install the module into the node_modules directory. You should see a new entry in package.json . The @ symbol tells npm to install the specific version we will be using for this tutorial. Running apm install lets Atom know to use our newly installed module.

"dependencies": {
  "request": "^2.73.0"
}

Downloading and logging HTML to the Developer Console

Import request into our main file by adding an import statement to the top of lib/sourcefetch.js :

import { CompositeDisposable } from 'atom'
import request from 'request'

Now, add a new function, download to the module's exports, below fetch :

export default {  

  /* subscriptions, activate(), deactivate() */

  fetch() {
    ...
  },

  download(url) {
    request(url, (error, response, body) => {
      if (!error && response.statusCode == 200) {
        console.log(body)
      }
    })
  }
}

This function uses request to download the contents of a web page and logs the output to the Developer Console. When the HTTP request completes, our callback function will be called with the response as an argument.

The final step is to update fetch so that it calls download :

fetch() {
  let editor
  if (editor = atom.workspace.getActiveTextEditor()) {
    let selection = editor.getSelectedText()
    this.download(selection)
  }
},

Instead of reversing the selected text, fetch now treats the selection as a URL, passing it to download . Let's see our changes in action:

  • Reload Atom by running the Window: Reload command.

  • Open the Developer Tools. To do this, navigate to View > Developer > Toggle Developer Tools in the menu.

  • Create a new file, navigate to File > New .

  • Enter and select a URL, for example, http://www.atom.io .

  • Run our package command in any of the three ways previously described:

Developer Toolsmake it easy to debug Atom packages. Any console.log statement will print to the interactive console, and you can use the Elements tab to explore the visual structure of the whole applicatio—which is just an HTML Document Object Model (DOM) .

See all code changes for this step in the sourcefetch tutorial repository .

Using Promises to insert downloaded HTML into the editor

Ideally, we would like our download function to return the HTML as a string instead of just printing page contents into the console. Returning body won't work, however, since we get access to body inside of the callback rather than download itself.

We will solve this problem by returning a Promise rather than the value itself. Let's change download to return a Promise:

download(url) {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    request(url, (error, response, body) => {
      if (!error && response.statusCode == 200) {
        resolve(body)
      } else {
        reject({
          reason: 'Unable to download page'
        })
      }
    })
  })
}

Promises allow us to return values obtained asynchronously by wrapping asynchronous logic in a function that provides two callbacks— resolve for returning a value successfully, and reject for notifying the caller of an error. We call reject if an error is returned by request , and resolve the HTML otherwise.

Let's change fetch to work with the Promise returned by download :

fetch() {
  let editor
  if (editor = atom.workspace.getActiveTextEditor()) {
    let selection = editor.getSelectedText()
    this.download(selection).then((html) => {
      editor.insertText(html)
    }).catch((error) => {
      atom.notifications.addWarning(error.reason)
    })
  }
},

In our new version of fetch , we get access to the HTML by calling then on the Promise returned by download . This lets us insert the HTML into the editor. We also accept and handle any errors returned by calling catch . We handle errors by displaying a warning notification using the Atom Notification API .

Let's see what changed. Reload Atom and run the package command on a selected URL:

If the command is run on an invalid URL, a warning notification will be displayed:

See all code changes for this step in the sourcefetch tutorial repository .

Building a scraper to extract code snippets from StackOverflow HTML

The next step involves extracting code snippets from the HTML of a StackOverflow page we obtained in the previous step. In particular, we're interested in code from the accepted answer —an answer chosen to be correct by the question author. We can greatly simplify our package implementation by assuming any such answer to be relevant and correct.

Constructing a query using jQuery and Chrome Developer Tools

This section assumes you are using theChrome web browser. You may be able to follow along using another browser, but instructions may change.

Let's take a look at a typical StackOverflow page that contains an accepted answer with a code snippet. We are going to explore the HTML using Chrome Developer Tools:

  • Open Chrome and navigate to any StackOverflow page containing an accepted answer with code, such as this hello world example in Python or this question about reading text from a file in C .

  • Scroll down to the accepted answer and highlight a section of the code snippet.

  • Right click and select Inspect

  • Inspect the location of the code snippet within the HTML code using the Elements browser.

Note that the document has the following structure:

<div class="accepted-answer">
  ...
    ...
      <pre>
        <code>
          ...snippet elements...
        </code>
      </pre>
    ...
  ...
</div>
  • The accepted answer is denoted by a div with class accepted-answer

  • Block code snippets are located inside a pre element

  • Elements that render the code snippet itself sit inside a code tag

Now let's construct a jQuery statement for extracting code snippets:

  • Click the Console tab within Developer Tools to access the JavaScript console.

  • Type $('div.accepted-answer pre code').text() into the console and press Enter.

You should see the accepted answer code snippets printed out in the console. The code we just ran uses a special $ function provided by jQuery. $ accepts a query string to select and return certain HTML elements from the website. Let's take a look at how this code works by considering a couple of intermediate example queries:

$('div.accepted-answer')
> [<div id="answer-1077349" class="answer accepted-answer" ... ></div>]

The above query will match all <div> elements that contain the class accepted-answer , in our case - just one div.

$('div.accepted-answer pre code')
> [<code>...</code>]

Building upon the previous, this query will match any <code> element that is inside a <pre> element contained within the previously matched <div> .

$('div.accepted-answer pre code').text()
> "print("Hello World!")"

The text function extracts and concatenates all text from the list of elements that would otherwise be returned by the previous query. This also strips out elements used for syntax highlighting purposes from the code.

Introducing Cheerio

Our next step involves using the query we created to implement a scraping function using Cheerio , a jQuery implementation for server-side applications.

Install Cheerio

  • Open your command line application, navigate to your package root directory and run:
npm install --save cheerio@0.20.0
apm install

Implement the scraping function

  • Add an import statement for cheerio in lib/sourcefetch.js :
import { CompositeDisposable } from 'atom'
import request from 'request'
import cheerio from 'cheerio'
  • Now create a new function that extracts code snippets given StackOverflow HTML, called scrape :
fetch() {
  ...
},

scrape(html) {
  $ = cheerio.load(html)
  return $('div.accepted-answer pre code').text()
},

download(url) {
  ...
}
  • Finally, let's change fetch to pass downloaded HTML to scrape instead of inserting it into the editor:
fetch() {
  let editor
  let self = this

  if (editor = atom.workspace.getActiveTextEditor()) {
    let selection = editor.getSelectedText()
    this.download(selection).then((html) => {
      let answer = self.scrape(html)
      if (answer === '') {
        atom.notifications.addWarning('No answer found :(')
      } else {
        editor.insertText(answer)
      }
    }).catch((error) => {
      console.log(error)
      atom.notifications.addWarning(error.reason)
    })
  }
},

Our scraping function is implemented in just two lines because cheerio does all of the work for us! We create a $ function by calling load with our HTML string, and use this function to run our jQuery statement and return the results. You can explore the entire Cheerio API in their developer documentation .

Testing the updated package

  • Reload Atom and run soucefetch:fetch on a selected StackOverflow URL to see the progress so far.

If we run the command on a page with an accepted answer, it will be inserted into the editor:

If we run the command on a page with no accepted answer, a warning notification will be displayed instead:

Our new iteration of fetch gives us the code snippet within a StackOverflow page instead of the entire HTML contents. Note that our updated fetch function checks for the absence of an answer and displays a notification to alert the user.

See all code changes for this step in the sourcefetch tutorial repository .

Implementing Google search to find relevant StackOverflow URLs

Now that we can turn StackOverflow URLs into code snippets, let's implement our final function, search , which will return a relevant URL given the description of a snippet, such as "hello world" or "quicksort". We will be using Google search via the unofficial google npm module, which allows us to search programmatically.

Installing the Google npm module

  • Install google by opening your command line application at the package root directory, and run:
npm install --save google@2.0.0
apm install

Importing and configuring the module

Add an import statement for google at the top of lib/sourcefetch.js :

import google from "google"

We will configure the library to limit the number of results returned during search. Add the following line below the import statement to limit returned results to just the top one.

google.resultsPerPage = 1

Implementing the search function

Next, let's implement our search function itself:

fetch() {
  ...
},

search(query, language) {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    let searchString = `${query} in ${language} site:stackoverflow.com`

    google(searchString, (err, res) => {
      if (err) {
        reject({
          reason: 'A search error has occured :('
        })
      } else if (res.links.length === 0) {
        reject({
          reason: 'No results found :('
        })
      } else {
        resolve(res.links[0].href)
      }
    })
  })
},

scrape() {
  ...
}

The code above searches Google for a StackOverflow page relevant to the given query and programming language, returning the URL of the top result. Let's take a look at how it works:

let searchString = `${query} in ${language} site:stackoverflow.com`

We construct the search string using the query entered by the user and the current language selected. For example, if the user types "hello world" while editing Python, the query will be hello world in python site:stackoverflow.com . The final part of the string is a filter provided by Google Search that lets us limit results to those linked to StackOverflow.

google(searchString, (err, res) => {
  if (err) {
    reject({
      reason: 'A search error has occured :('
    })
  } else if (res.links.length === 0) {
    reject({
      reason: 'No results found :('
    })
  } else {
    resolve(res.links[0].href)
  }
})

We wrap the call to google inside a Promise so that we can return our URL asynchronously. We propagate any errors returned by the library, also returning an error when there are no results available. We resolve the URL of the top result otherwise.

Updating fetch to use search

Our final step is to update fetch to use search :

fetch() {
  let editor
  let self = this

  if (editor = atom.workspace.getActiveTextEditor()) {
    let query = editor.getSelectedText()
    let language = editor.getGrammar().name

    self.search(query, language).then((url) => {
      atom.notifications.addSuccess('Found google results!')
      return self.download(url)
    }).then((html) => {
      let answer = self.scrape(html)
      if (answer === '') {
        atom.notifications.addWarning('No answer found :(')
      } else {
        atom.notifications.addSuccess('Found snippet!')
        editor.insertText(answer)
      }
    }).catch((error) => {
      atom.notifications.addWarning(error.reason)
    })
  }
}

Let's take a look at what changed:

  • Our selected text is now treated as the query entered by the user.

  • We obtain the language of the current editor tab using the TextEditor API

  • We call search to obtain a URL, which we access by calling then on the resulting Promise

  • Instead of calling then on the Promise returned by download , we instead return the Promise itself and chain another then call onto the original call. This helps us avoid callback hell

See all code changes for this step in the sourcefetch tutorial repository .

Testing the final plugin

And we're done! See the final plugin in action by reloading Atom and running our package command on a problem description, and don't forget to select a language in the bottom-right corner.

Next steps

Now that you know the basics of hacking Atom, feel free to practice what you've learned by forking the sourcefetch repository and adding your own features .





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