Do you Use CLR in SQL Server?

Datetime:2016-08-22 22:52:50          Topic: SQL Server  Assembler  SQL           Share

We don’t use CLR assemblies in SQL Server. For us, programming in the database means that maybe “you’re doing it wrong”. But there have been rare circumstances where I’ve wondered about what the feature can do for us.

For example, creating a CLR assembly to do string processing for a one-time data migration might be preferable to writing regular SQL using SQL Server’s severely limited built-in functions that do string processing.

Deployment Issues

I’ve always dismissed CLR as part of any solution because the deployment story was too cumbersome. We enjoy some really nice automated deployment tools. To create an assembly, SQL Server needs to be able to access the dll. And all of a sudden our deployment tools need more than just a connection string, the tools now need to be able to place a file where SQL Server can see it… or so I thought.

Deploy Assemblies Using Bits

CREATE ASSEMBLY supports specifying a CLR assembly using bits, a bit stream that can be specified using regular T-SQL. The full method is described in Deploying CLR Database Objects . In practice, the CREATE ASSEMBLY statement looks something like:

CREATE ASSEMBLY [MyAssembly]
FROM 0x4D5A900003000000040000... -- truncated binary literal
WITH PERMISSION_SET = SAFE

This completely gets around the need for deployments to use the file system. I was unaware of this option until today.

Your Experience

So what’s your experience? My mistaken assumptions kept me from evaluating CLR properly. I wonder if anyone is in the same position I was in and I wonder if this accounts for the low adoption in general of CLR in SQL Server. Answer this survey, Which option best describes you?





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